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Efficient Use of Travis-CI's Cache For Rust Builds

4 minute read Published:

A while ago, I complained on Reddit about the Travis-CI build times for my Rust crates. Aleksey Kladov, better known in the Rust community as “matklad”, responded to mention that Travis-CI’s caching behavior is… suboptimal for Rust crates and gave me a way to fix it. I figure there are probably other Rust developers out there who aren’t aware of this, so I’m writing a short post to explain it.

Work-Efficiency vs. Step-Efficiency

5 minute read Published:

At work recently, I found myself trying to explain the Work-Efficiency vs Step-Efficiency tradeoff to a coworker, but when I searched for online resources to help I couldn’t find any that I liked, so I decided to take a shot at writing my own. I found this idea presented in a video lecture series about programming for GPGPUs on Youtube a while ago. However, it’s just as applicable to any form of parallel processing, from SIMD instructions running on a single CPU core up to massive clusters of thousands of computers.

Criterion.rs v0.3 - Custom Measurements, Profiling Hooks, Custom Test Framework, API Changes

3 minute read Published:

I’m pleased to announce the release of Criterion.rs v0.3, available today. Version 0.3 provides a number of new features including preliminary support for plugging in custom measurements (eg. hardware timers or POSIX CPU time), hooks to start/stop profilers, a new BenchmarkGroup struct that provides more flexibility than the older Benchmark and ParameterizedBenchmark structs, and an implementation of a #[criterion] custom-test-framework macro for those on Nightly. What is Criterion.rs? Criterion.rs is a statistics-driven benchmarking library for Rust.

Announcing RustaCUDA v0.1.0

7 minute read Published:

In my post on GPGPU in Rust, I declared that I intended to work on improving the state of CUDA support in Rust. Since then, I’ve been mostly radio-silent. I’m pleased to announce that I have actually been working on something, and I’ve finally published that something. RustaCUDA RustaCUDA is a new wrapper crate for the CUDA driver API. It allows the programmer to allocate and free GPU memory, copy data to and from the GPU, load CUDA modules and launch kernels, all with a mostly-safe, programmer-friendly, Rust-y interface.

Porting My CUDA Path Tracer to ptx-builder/linker

8 minute read Published:

A bunch of stuff has happened since I published my post on The State of GPGPU in Rust. Most importantly, Denys Zariaiev (@denzp) released his work on a custom linker for Rust CUDA kernels, and a build.rs helper crate to make it easier to use. These two crates eliminate many of the problems I referred to in my previous post. The linker solves most of the “invalid PTX file” problems, while the ptx-builder crate does all of the magic that Accel was doing behind the scenes.

The State of GPGPU in Rust

6 minute read Published:

At work a few months ago, we started experimenting with GPU-acceleration. My boss asked if I was interested. I didn’t know anything about programming GPUs, so of course I said “Heck yes, I’m interested!“. I needed to learn about GPUs in a hurry, and that led to my GPU Path Tracer series. That was a lot of fun, but it showed me that CUDA support in Rust is pretty poor.

Writing a GPU-Accelerated Path Tracer in Rust - Part 3

17 minute read Published:

Hello! Welcome to my third and final post on my GPU-accelerated Path Tracer in Rust. In the last post, we implemented all of the logic necessary to build a true path tracer. Problem is, even on the GPU it’s terrifically slow. This post is (mostly) about fixing that. But first, we need to fix a bug or two, because I goofed. *sad trombone* Step -1: Fixing Bugs /u/anderslanglands on Reddit pointed out that, since I’m using Cosine-weighted Importance Sampling, I need to do some extra math to avoid biasing the results.

Writing a GPU-Accelerated Path Tracer in Rust - Part 2

16 minute read Published:

Hello, and welcome to part two of my series on writing a GPU-accelerated path tracer in Rust. I’d meant to have this post up sooner, but nothing ruins my productivity quite like Games Done Quick. I’m back now, though, so it’s time to turn the GPU ray-tracer from the last post into a real path tracer. Tracing Paths As mentioned last time, Path Tracing is an extension to Ray Tracing which attempts to simulate global illumination.

Writing a GPU-Accelerated Path Tracer in Rust - Part 1

15 minute read Published:

Well, it’s that time again. This is the start of a second series of articles on raytracing in Rust following on from my previous series. This time, I’ll be doing all of the rendering on a GPU using Accel - see my previous post on Accel. I thought this would be a good project for learning about GPU programming, see. Second, this time I want to write a path tracer, rather than a raytracer.

Running Rust on the GPU with Accel

13 minute read Published:

NOTE: Much of what I discuss below is no longer accurate. For the past month or so, I’ve been working on a follow-up to my series on Writing a Raytracer in Rust. This time around, I’ll be talking about writing a GPU-accelerated Path Tracer. As always, I’m writing it in Rust - including the GPU kernel code. Compiling Rust for GPUs at this point is difficult and error-prone, so I thought it would be good to start with some documentation on that aspect of the problem before diving into path tracing.